Tysons Corner, VA

(Updated 2:35 p.m.) Falls Church Police have made two arrests after they say a massage parlor customer was sexually assaulted.

“Police responded to Rainbow Massage (800 W Broad St., Unit 101) after a victim reported inappropriate touching during a massage,” according to a police press release.

On Friday (April 19) police arrested 60-year-old Dongfang Chen and 55-year-old Zao Wen Xie. Chen was charged with Sexual Battery and Massage Permit Violations. Xie was charged with allowing an Unlicensed Massage.

Detectives believe there may be more victims, the press release says. Anyone with information can contact the City of Falls Church Police at 703-248-5053.

More from the press release:

Per City Code Sec. 8-74, a massage establishment must have a permit to operate in the City of Falls Church. All massage therapists must be certified by both the Virginia Board of Nursing and have a massage therapist permit from the City of Falls Church. Customers have the right to view all appropriate permits and licenses upon request.

Image via Google Maps

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A dream trip came true for a young girl from Falls Church because of the Make-A-Wish Foundation’s Mid-Atlantic chapter.

Three-year-old Kathryn had a bone marrow transplant last year and wished to go to the Walt Disney World Resort. Earlier this year, she headed to Orlando to meet in person some of her favorite characters from the Disney Junior network.

“Her favorite show is Mickey Mouse Clubhouse, and she likes to repeat lines, sing along and dance while she watches the characters on TV,” Make-A-Wish Mid-Atlantic wrote to Tysons Reporter. “She was thrilled to meet Mickey Mouse three separate times on her trip, and she had a blast going on rides at the parks.”

Kathryn and her family stayed at the Give Kids The World Village, a resort for kids with critical illnesses and their families. While there, Kathryn celebrated her favorite holiday during the resort’s weekly Halloween night on Mondays in the middle of January. She also visited the Wizarding World of Harry Potter and practiced doing “magic” with her new wand at Universal Orlando.

“The wish transformed Kathryn’s life by giving her the opportunity to leave behind the stress of dealing with a critical illness and just enjoy being a kid,” according to Make-A-Wish Mid-Atlantic.

Photo courtesy Make-A-Wish Mid-Atlantic

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City of Falls Church police are looking for more information regarding a peeping tom seen outside of Saint James Catholic School (830 Park Avenue).

According to a press release, a man was spotted outside of the school on Saturday, April 13, at 7 p.m.

“An unknown subject was observed outside watching parents and children through a window while touching himself inappropriately,” according to the police report. “The suspect ran when confronted.”

The suspect was described as “a Hispanic male, approximately 30 years of age, 5’6” height, medium build, ‘crew-cut’ hairstyle, wearing a white button down shirt with blue jeans.”

Anyone with information is asked to contact the Falls Church Police at 703-248-5053.

File photo

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Laura Schwartz is a licensed Realtor in VA, D.C. and MD with McEnearney Associates in McLean. Reach the office at 703-790-9090.

Most of the detached homes in our area do not belong to a homeowners association (HOA).

Most are regulated by county or town ordinance, but there are some that belong to an HOA. Some people love or hate this. Many of the HOA’s around Tyson’s include very little, maybe some yard maintenance in common areas, sometimes trash removal, but usually maybe one community party a year. If you see a townhouse, assume those always have an HOA.

I put together a list of HOAs in Vienna, McLean and Falls Church that actually give you something for your annual fees. Below is a list of the name and location, along with what the amenity included is. If you’re thinking you want to skip that 8 year wait for the Vienna Woods pool, try one of these neighborhoods instead (listed alphabetically):

Vienna

  • Edgemoore — Tennis courts
  • Estates at Great Falls — Outdoor pool, tennis courts, basketball courts
  • Hunter Mill Estates — Outdoor pool and tennis courts
  • Lakevale Estates — Outdoor pool and tennis courts
  • Oakton Glen — Tennis courts and basketball courts
  • Shouse Village — Outdoor pool and tennis courts, basketball courts
  • Williamsburg Commons — Outdoor pool

McLean

Falls Church

  • Walnut Hill — Tennis courts
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A woman allegedly walked into American Bird Company (7219 Lee Highway) in Falls Church and walked out with stolen baby birds — twice.

Police say on March 30 the theft of a young green Indian ring-neck — a type of parakeet — was reported at the store. The bird had an estimated value of over $700.

Then, two days later on April 1, an employee at the store said the woman they suspected had stolen the first bird was seen returning to the store. When a manager confronted her, the employee said she ran out of the store holding two birds.

The employee said the manager chased the woman down the street. An older bird was able to get free and was captured, but the employee said she managed to hold onto a young grey cockatoo. Police said the estimated value of the bird was $250.

A video showed the woman in the store, but police said it had no identifying information. The store employee said a bird had only been stolen from the store — which has been in business since 1989 — once before.

“It’s a terrible thing,” the employee said. “They’re young and she probably doesn’t know how to care for them.”

Photo of a baby cockatoo via Flickr/Rob and Stephanie Levy

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You’re looking good, Falls Church. Have you been working out?

The City of Falls Church has been ranked the third healthiest community in the United States, according to new rankings by U.S. News & World Report.

The study assessed nearly 3,000 counties and other jurisdictions across 81 indicators, including population health, food and nutrition, and public safety. Falls Church was ranked just behind Los Alamos County, New Mexico and Douglas County, Colorado.

Falls Church scored particularly high on education and public safety, though like most of the top-ranked communities it ranked fairly poorly in housing affordability.

Falls Church News-Press noted that the high ranking was actually a slight dip for Falls Church, which last year was ranked at the top of the list.

Falls Church was immediately followed in the rankings by Loudoun County at No. 4. Fairfax County was ranked No. 13, though its actual population health score (95) was higher than Falls Church (92.8).

Photo via Instagram

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Falls Church a city almost exactly 100 years older than the first daguerreotype cameras. It was a recruiting station for the American militia in the Revolutionary War and the scene of minor skirmishes throughout the American Civil War.

But even so, it’s a city that’s gone through numerous changes over the last 80 years of Fairfax County’s aerial photography.

Unlike most of nearby Tysons, Falls Church already has the visible bones of a small city by the photography from 1937. The familiar street network is in place, with several homes situated along the intersection of Broad and Washington Streets.

By 1953, the Winter Hill neighborhood was built, and the cookie-cutter pattern of American suburbia was starting to stamp down on fields around the town.

The aerial photography is spotty after that, with no coverage in the 1960s or 70s, but returns in 1980, when downtown Falls Church’s transition to strip malls and small shopping centers was in full swing.  New streets, like Annandale Road, also connected businesses along Washington Street to homes and other businesses along Broad Street.

There was less change between 1980 and 1990 though, when most the changes took place at the western end of the downtown area where new apartments and new shopping centers were built closer to Lee Street or with new northeast of Broad Street.

Like nearby Vienna, the pace of development in Falls Church slowed dramatically after 1990. Very little of the town’s shape and structure changed between 1990 and 2007, and less between 2007 and 2017.

One of the most visible changes in downtown Falls Church was the construction of the Harris Teeter in 2016, the first grocery store in the city’s downtown in three decades.

Previous Then and Now features from around the area include:

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Dockless electronic scooters are coming to Fairfax County.

Lime scooters will soon be released on the streets of Vienna, Merrifield and Falls Church, according to a press release.

“We’re thrilled to expand our footprint in the DMV area and to begin serving Fairfax, providing accessible, affordable mobility options to riders across the city,” Sean Arroyo, Lime’s regional general manager, said in a press release. “We couldn’t be more excited to integrate ourselves into the community and to begin working with local leaders to help achieve their sustainability and accessibility goals.”

Users can use the Lime app to locate the nearest scooter, then scan the QR code on the handlebars or baseboard to use it. Users are encouraged to ride in bike lanes and wear helmets.

Scooters cost $1 to unlock and 15 cents per minute to ride. Rides are finished in the app to be parked at a street curb or bike rack. Riders must be 18 years or older.

E-scooters are popular in major cities D.C., and are already ubiquitous in close-in suburbs like Arlington, but the hoards of abandoned scooters left haphazardly strewn across the streets has also drawn some criticism or even dramatic acts of vandalism.

In addition to Vienna, Falls Church and Merrifield, Lime says it is also bringing scooters to George Mason University and the City of Fairfax.

Photo via Facebook

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A combination of a bubble tea shop and electronic dance music lounge is set to arrive soon along Maple Avenue.

Currently in Falls Church at the Eden Center, TeaDM Lounge plans to open a new location at 142 Maple Ave W. — the former spot of E.G. Comics.

A TeaDM Lounge employee told Tysons Reporter that a grand opening is expected near the end of April.

Locals who don’t want to wait the month can head to 6765 Wilson Blvd for a taste of the bubble tea, flavored tea, coffee and smoothies paired with electric beats.

Photo via Facebook 

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Nightlife may be one of Tysons’ weak spots, but local music in the area has a long history — and a wide-open future.

The Fairfax scene is very diverse, drawing on artists who are local to the county as well as those from elsewhere in the greater D.C. area.

Emblematic of that diversity is an upcoming performance on Saturday, March 23 at the VFW post in west Falls Church. Six different acts will be playing music — two punk groups, three rappers representing a variety of styles and an indie rock four-piece.

D.C. is famous for its historical punk scene, with names like Fugazi that defined a sound across the entire country — but much of that scene happened on the southern side of the Potomac. Although not all of its current residents are aware, Northern Virginia has a strong tradition of independent music. In the 1980s and ’90s, most of that tradition was being made in Arlington.

The little county was home to the nationally-successful punk group Minor Threat, whose frontman Ian MacKaye later starred in Fugazi, as well as many other bands. It also boasted the Dischord and Teenbeat record labels and the Positive Force activist group, which was closely associated with the “Riot Grrrl” feminist movement.

These groups were often based out of houses, dotted across Arlington. The county was successful musically because it was cheap and offered easy access to the city — but, unfortunately for the punks, the rest of society caught on.

Today, the median home on the Arlington market is listed at over $700,000, and there aren’t many places left in the county for young musicians living on a shoestring budget. In the words of Positive Force co-founder Mark Andersen, “there was another Arlington that existed, and that was a much more humble Arlington.”

In some ways, Fairfax carries on that tradition. By offering (relatively) affordable performance spaces, a large population of potential audiences and a wide network of musical collaborators, the county has a lot to offer a young musician.

There are some major differences, though: today’s scene isn’t only about punk music. Also, it’s less tied to D.C. than it used to be, and has more potential to define itself as “NOVA” music.  It does face some obstacles, though, including the drain of talent and attention to nearby cities like Richmond and Baltimore, and, as in Arlington, the difficulty of coexisting with some of the most desirable residential neighborhoods on the East Coast.

To understand what it’s like to record and perform in Fairfax today, Tysons Reporter spoke with Jason Saul, a melodic rapper native to the area.

Tysons Reporter: First, how did you get to be making music in VA?  Are you originally from the area?  When did you start rapping, and what’s driven you to the style you use?

Jason Saul: I was born & raised in NOVA. I started writing music when I was 13 but it was never anything super serious… Once I turned 20 I realized there wasn’t anything else that brought me the amount of joy that making music does. So now I’m seeking to make music my career. My style comes from influences of music that I listened to when I was young. I’ve always enjoyed storytelling or making music the correlates with the listener. To me, music is all about feeling. Eventually I started to make more melodic music since that’s what I always gravitated towards.

Tysons Reporter: Second, what should I know about the NOVA scene in general? How does it compare to other scenes around the D.C. area — does it have a particular identity compared to, say, D.C. or Maryland? Is it known for particular styles, or for particular venues? Do you want to stay around here, or, if not, where would you go?

Jason Saul: The NOVA scene is very interesting when it comes to music because I see it as a big question mark on the creative map. No one can really say NOVA has a particular sound, and I think that stems from no one really making it out on to the mainstream platform yet. I know there’s Kali Uchis but that’s just one artist. I respect D.C. a lot because it’s so rich with culture but I would definitely separate NOVA from D.C. just because it really feels like two different worlds. MD in my opinion is known for their raw rapping which is great. It’s up to NOVA to see what we come up with now. I’d love to stay here and I probably will but I also enjoy the weather in the west coast.

Tysons Reporter: Third, it’s pretty cool to see this wide a mix of sounds at a single show. Is that standard, would you say, or is this unusual? If it’s unusual, what helped bring it together this time?

Jason Saul: It’s very exciting to see a show like this going down because it’s bringing different groups of people together. I wouldn’t say it’s the ordinary but it’s definitely going to be a good show and should happen more often. What helped bring it together was the relationships some of us have outside of music, just knowing each other really. This gives the audience and artists a great opportunity to discover some music they never thought they’d listen to.

To listen to some of Fairfax’s local musicians, check out these artists, who will be performing at 6:30pm – 11pm on Saturday, March 23, at the VFW Post #9274 (7118 Shreve Road), just 10 minutes from Tysons on Leesburg Pike. There will be a $5 cover charge, and Respawn Thrift will be selling vintage clothing.

Desperry (NoVA, Hip-hop)

Holographic (NoVA, Hardcore punk bootgaze)

Jason Saul (NoVA, Melodic hip-hop)

Needle (D.C., Grind punk)

Wisteria (MD, Indie rock)

Lil Dynamite (NoVA, first show)

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