Tysons, VA

In the basement of a building in the Cedar Park Shopping Center, Mike’s Warehouse appears to sell everything from snacks to backpacks — and potentially beer in the near future.

Mike’s Convenience is located in the basement at 260 Cedar Lane SE. Affordable Lawn Sprinklers and Lighting also has a spot in the building. At one point, the building also housed a BB&T branch.

The convenience store applied for its beer license earlier this month and is awaiting a decision.

Hours of operation are not listed online or at the location, which was closed around 10 a.m. today (Thursday, Nov. 21). It is unclear when the shop originally came to the spot.

Tysons Reporter reached out to the owners and are waiting for a response for more information.

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The Chick-fil-A in Vienna officially opened its doors this morning (Thursday) with a promotion for free food.

Starting at 6 p.m. last night (Nov. 20), community members were encouraged to camp out in front of the store at 538 W. Maple Avenue with the promise that the first 100 customers in line this morning for the official opening at 6 a.m. would be given free meals for a year.

Around 104 people showed up for the grand opening celebration that featured Mayor Laurie DiRocco and other town representatives, according to a company spokesperson.

The campout is a standing tradition for all new location openings, according to Chick-fil-A’s website.

From now on, the location will be open 6 a.m. until 10 p.m. Monday-Saturday and closed on Sundays.

The new location features a drive-thru as well as an indoor dining room, playroom and outdoor seating.

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Longtime Vienna furniture retailer Posh! has reopened in Vienna after closing its Maple Avenue location.

The store moved in September to 200 Dominion Road NE — just a short drive from its previous location (419 E. Maple Avenue). Owner Mary Anne Antonides is also considering expanding to another location in McLean, although she wasn’t sure when that might happen.

The new spot previously was a design studio for Antonides, but was not always open to the public, like it is today.

Posh! has resided in the building for 27 years in one capacity or another, Antonides said, adding that repurposing the location allows them to expand their “entrepreneurial opportunities.”

Currently, the shop is running a pre-Christmas sale that gives customers a 20% discount on Christmas items and custom floral arrangement and 30% off everything else in the store as a “thank you” to customers who followed Posh! to its new location.

The hours of operation are Mondays-Tuesdays from 10 a.m. until 5:30 p.m. and Thursday-Saturday from 10 a.m. until 5:30 p.m. The shop is closed on Wednesdays and Sundays.

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Several new stores took residency in Tysons Corner Center throughout the last weeks — including a holiday shop with locally sourced gifts.

Newcomers to the mall include the Creative Collective POPUP, Seletti, Terres da’ Afrique — all in BrandBox spaces on the first level — and Beauty Nail Bar upstairs.

Creative Collective reopened for the season on Friday (Nov. 15) and will remain open through Christmas Eve (Dec. 24) during mall hours from 10 a.m. until 9:30 p.m. daily.

The shop acts as a market for roughly 2o local vendors offering a variety of goods including hats, jewelry, leatherworks, prints and even children’s books. Shoppers also have the opportunity to meet the artists and vendors in person and ask them about their craft.

Meanwhile, Italian home goods store Seletti sells furniture, decorations, lights and other items. The Tysons Corner Center location is the company’s first physical store in the U.S.

One of their bestsellers is a $400 monkey lamp, a store representative told Tysons Reporter.

“Some people are familiar with our brand and others are just intrigued,” the spokesperson said about people who stop in for a look, adding that the company is trying to gauge interest for the brand around Tysons.

If the pop-up is successful in the next six months, the brand might decide to open up a permanent shop elsewhere in the mall, the representative said.

Terres da’ Afrique, which opened Saturday (Nov. 16), sits right next to Seletti in BrandBox and offers shoppers personal skincare products including massage and facial oil.

Located on level two of the mall near the Paul Mitchell School, beauty Nail Bar made its debut roughly two weeks ago, an employee told Tysons Reporter.

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The Pennywise Thrift Shop found a new home in Vienna — just around the corner from its previous location.

The shop originally resided nearf the corner of Church and Mill streets, but was forced to move after a fire ravaged the 100-year old building in January. The new location (214 Dominion Road NE) has been open for roughly a month and offers slightly more retail space, Mary Coulombe, a shop spokesperson said.

The shop sells a variety of everyday items including clothes, kitchen items, books, shoes, glassware and small furniture.

The shop is run by the Church of the Holy Comforter, and all of the proceeds go to charities, Coulombe said, adding, “We are here as a mission.”

This year marks the thrift shop’s 57th anniversary, Coulombe said. Another staff member told Tysons Reporter that the new location will be the thrift shop’s home for at least the next couple of years.

The shop plans to celebrate its new spot with a grand re-opening ceremony on Saturday (Nov. 23) from 10 a.m.-5 p.m.

Pennywise Thrift Shop is open from Tuesday-Friday from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. and Saturdays from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. The shop is closed on Sundays and Mondays.

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(Updated 11/21/19) A recruiting company in Tysons wants to hire hundreds of employees in Tysons — making them the largest job creator in recent months in Fairfax County.

In the third quarter of 2019, the Fairfax County Economic Development Authority announced that 14 companies are adding 456 jobs to the county — including 358 positons in Tysons.

Randstad North America, Inc., an IT recruiting and staffing firm whose parent company is based in the Netherlands, announced they will add 300 information technology jobs in fiscal year 2020.

INADEV, another information technology company, is the runner up for job creation in Tysons for the third quarter by bringing 25 jobs to the area.

Here is the alphabetical list of the rest of the companies bringing jobs into Fairfax County:

Companies in the Tysons area also topped the list for the most added jobs when FCEDA worked with 35 businesses in the second quarter.

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After Bey Lounge got in trouble over the Town of Vienna’s noise ordinance, the location’s owners decided to pivot and convert the space into a grocery store.

The new supermarket (303 NE Mill Street) opened around a month ago, according to a store clerk. It offers customers a variety of Middle Eastern and Mediterranean fare, including dates, sesame paste and dried garbanzo beans.

The owners are trying to replace the current “Bey Lounge” sign with one that says “LB Food Market,” according to town documents.

Customers can enter through Wooden Bakery next door and are free to stop for a snack while they shop since both establishments are owned by the same people.

The bakery and store are both open 9 a.m-midnight Sunday-Thursday and from 9 a.m. until 2 a.m. Friday-Saturday.

Though open for operation, the store is not yet fully stocked yet and staff said it will be at least three weeks before they are ready for a grand opening.

Tysons Reporter checked out the location and saw that though most of the dry goods seem to be stocked, the freezers and refrigerators in the back are still empty.

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The Weekly Planner is a roundup of interesting events coming up over the next week in the Tysons area.

We’ve scoured the web for events of note in Tysons, Vienna, Merrifield, McLean and Falls Church. Know of any we’ve missed? Tell us!

Wednesday (Nov. 20)

  • Holiday Extravaganza — 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at Sheraton Tysons Hotel (8661 Leesburg Pike) — This event combines networking with shopping and holiday spirit. The event will feature food, drinks, keynote talks and booths with shopping opportunities. Tickets start at $75.

Thursday (Nov. 21)

  • Canning at Caboose Commons — 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Caboose Commons (2918 Eskridge Road) — People can learn about canning Caboose’s Fog and Citra Session IPAs.

Saturday (Nov. 23)

  • Christmas Market — 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Andrew Chapel United Methodist Church (1301 Trap Road) — At this market, people will be selling various items including baked goods, candles, wreaths and various gifts. Gift wrapping is available on-site and Santa will make an appearance for photos as well.
  • 50s’ Sock Hop — 7 to 9 p.m. at Vienna Community Center, Auxiliary Gym (120 SE Cherry Street) — This event invites community members to come together for a friendly evening of dancing. Admission is $5 at the door and free for kids under 5.
  • Apple Brandy Bottling Party — 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Falls Church Distillers (442 S. Washington Street) — This party celebrates the release of the distillery’s new batch of Apple Brandy. This event is free but organizers ask that attendees RSVP through email.
  • Winter Walk of Lights — 5 to 10 p.m. at Meadowlark Botanical Gardens (9750 Meadowlark Gardens Court) — This event allows community members to enjoy holiday lights at the gardens. Hot drinks and smores are available for purchase on-site. Tickets are $14 and $8 for kids.

Sunday (Nov. 24)

  • Sensory-Friendly Santa — 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. at Tysons Galleria (2001 International Drive) — Autism Speaks partnered with Tysons Galleria to invite children of all abilities to enjoy the Christmas festivities. The event page said that this will provide a calm environment for kids to meet Santa.
  • Sutton Foster at Wolf Trap — 6:30 p.m. at Wolf Trap (1635 Trap Road) — Tony Award-winning singer Sutton Foster will take the stage as one of Wolf Trap’s last performances for November. Tickets to her performance start at $67.
  • Hope Family Fun Festival — 2 to 5 p.m. at Thomas Jefferson Elementary School (601 S. Oak Street) — This festival allows community members and families to come together for an afternoon of face painting, moon bounces, yoga lessons, games and prizes for kids.

Photo via Falls Church Distillers LLC/Facebook

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Tysons may not have the liveliest nightlife at the moment, but that could soon change as more late-night restaurants and places to hang out open. “Tysons After Dark” will highlight a different spot every week.

The new Whole Foods in The Boro has caught the attention of people looking for happy hour deals after work with its brand new bar High Point.

Located on the top floor inside Whole Foods, the bar offers guests 16 regional beers and ciders along with a variety of cocktails and wine. People can enjoy their drinks at the bar, anywhere throughout the store while they shop or while they play shuffleboard and various arcade games like pinball.

High Point also offers happy hour deals Monday through Thursday, including $1 off ceratin pours. For those who don’t want to commit to a full drink, the bar also offers sample size tasters for $3 — all day, every day.

Last Friday night, Tysons Reporter decided to enjoy a 16-ounce pumpkin favored Wild Hare Hard Cider from Leesburg, which cost $7, while people-watching.

By 5 p.m. the bar was getting busy and seats were scarce. Young professionals in their mid-20s’ to early-40s’ enjoyed the hangout spot.

Tysons residents Tim McCall and Miguel Barrios told Tysons Reporter that the new Whole Foods is two blocks from their apartment, so they decided to try it out as a pregame spot before they went for a night out in D.C.

“This is going to make us sound old, but it seems like a quiet place for a drink,” McCall said.

Around five different bartenders assisted customers throughout the evening, each staying busy and serving customers in rapid succession. For those who don’t want to wait for a drink at the bar, the self-serve wine and beer stations were a popular option, even though they had a narrower selection.

ESPN was playing on the flat-screen TVs scattered throughout the area for all of the sports fans.

By 5:30 p.m. there was only standing-room at the bar, and different groups were sharing nearby tables. Things began to get rowdy as people raised their voices to compete with the conversations going on around them. Laughter echoed around the room and people seemed eager to kick off their weekend. 

A bartender told Tysons Reporter that business has been extremely steady all week and the spot is pretty popular, especially around lunchtime. 

The energy in the room stayed pretty consistent until 8 p.m. Then things began to slow down, and people went about their evening.

High Point is open seven days a week from 7 a.m. until 10 p.m.

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Meetings to decide the fate of the Northern Virginia Juvenile Detention Center kicked off last night in Falls Church.

About two dozen people gathered last night at the Falls Church City Hall (300 Park Avenue) for the first of three regional meetings to get input on what should happen to the facility.

The center currently serves Falls Church, Arlington and Alexandria as a detention facility for kids deemed a flight risk while awaiting trial or a danger to themselves or others. But since juvenile incarceration rates have fallen more than 72%  since 2006, according to a spokesperson for the Moss Group, the center no longer fills its 70-bed capacity. 

Community leaders commissioned a study by the Moss Group to evaluate the efficiency of the center and options for its future.

Currently, there are 27 kids held in the facility, Johnitha McNair, the executive director of the center, said. Options include closing the center, remodeling it or simply cutting down on staff and bed size.

Attendees included curious community members from Arlington, Alexandria and Falls Church, board members who run the center, representatives from the NAACP, members of the Falls Church City Council, an American University student and professional child advocates.

A spokesman from the NAACP said he is concerned about what will happen if the center is closed, noting that the numbers may rise and fall throughout the years, potentially leaving the three cities in a conundrum if incarceration rates rise again.

Several attendees brought up issues not with the capacity issues of the facility, but rather with how the facility is run and how the physical design might impact the kids being held within.

Attorney Juliet Hiznay, who has been practicing law in the realm of education law and has experience helping children with special needs, said she toured the facility in 2018 and was disheartened by what she saw. She said she doesn’t think that the detention center can be repurposed without extreme structural changes.

“My concern is not about the goodwill of the people running the facility, but the physical limitations of the facility itself,” she said, adding that the cell-block structure of the center is poorly designed for kids. “I find it hard to believe it could be repurposed for any type of therapeutic intervention.”

Hiznay said there were few windows in the facility that allowed for suitable sunlight, limited mobility within in the center, very few opportunities for kids to get exercise and fresh air and that the kids she interacted with seemed desperate for attention.

McNair, the center’s director, countered a few of Hiznay’s statements through, saying that kids in the detention center have “ample” time to play outside and interact with one another. NcNair also said that there are at least two 12″ by 48″ windows in each cell room and that kids are kept busy throughout the day with activities such as group therapy, social rehabilitation programs and reentry initiatives.

There was discussion throughout the evening about redesigning the center to include a more open “dorm-style” floor plan that are seen in other detention facilities, which would stop queuing when kids try to enter new rooms, but experts at the meeting expressed potential security concerns around this idea.

Moss Group representatives at the meeting said they work with an architect who can advise city officials on their options to remodel the center.

“We work very hard to recognize that our clients are children,” McNair said at last night’s meeting, adding that she hopes to keep the center in operation and is open to structural changes that would allow the center to rethink its approach by making programs more focused on mental health and constructive development.

Mental health and the ability to better assist kids that walk through the center’s doors came up several times throughout the meeting.

McNair said that the staff noticed that a lot of the young women were acting up around 8 p.m. when they were supposed to go to bed. After some thinking, they realized that this was because bedtime was when a lot of the girls in the center experienced abuse at home and were possibly experiencing symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder and anxiety.

“We already know the percent of kids going into these facilities with trauma and mental health issues are very high,” Hiznay told Tysons Reporter in an interview after the public hearing.

Now, two more similar public hearings will be held in Alexandria (Lee Center Exhibit Hall, 1108 Jefferson Street) next Wednesday (Nov. 20) from 7 to 8:30 p.m. and in Arlington (Central Library Auditorium, 1015 N. Quincy Street) next Thursday (Nov. 21) from 7 to 8:30 p.m.

People who cannot attend the meeting can fill out an online survey.

The final report from the Moss Group is set to come out in January. The Alexandria, Falls Church and Alexandria governments will review it in February and March. It is unclear when a final plan for the center will be announced.

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