The National Weather Service has issued a Flash Flood Watch for the D.C. area, including Fairfax County.

The alert will take effect at 2 p.m. tomorrow (Thursday) and last through 8 a.m. on Friday (June 2). Thunderstorms could bring up to four inches of rain in some locations.

Here is more from the alert:

* From Thursday afternoon through Friday morning.

* Several rounds of thunderstorms are expected Thursday afternoon through early Friday morning with localized rainfall rates of up to 1-2 inches per hour possible. Total rainfall amounts of 1-3 inches, with locally higher amounts up to 4 inches are possible.

* Heavy rain in short periods of time will cause the potential for streams and creeks to quickly rise out of their banks as well as the potential for flash flooding in urban areas.

“You should monitor later forecasts and be prepared to take action should Flash Flood Warnings be issued,” the NWS says.

According to the NWS forecast for Tysons, the storms are expected to bring the area’s temperatures from the 90s back to the 60-70 degree range for the weekend, setting the stage for a mostly clear, sunny Independence Day.

0 Comments

The rain just keeps coming.

While a Flash Flood Warning issued yesterday (Thursday) for the D.C. region, including Fairfax County, was canceled ahead of schedule at 7:15 p.m., the National Weather Service has extended the Flash Flood Watch that was set to end at midnight through today (Friday).

Issued at 3:03 a.m., the new alert will be in effect through this evening, as showers and thunderstorms are expected to bring two to four additional inches of rain to the area.

Here is the full alert:

…FLASH FLOOD WATCH IN EFFECT THROUGH THIS EVENING…

The National Weather Service in Sterling Virginia has expanded the

* Flash Flood Watch to include portions of Virginia and West Virginia, including the following areas: in Virginia, Clarke, Eastern Loudoun, Fairfax, Frederick VA, Page, Shenandoah, Warren and Western Loudoun. In West Virginia, Berkeley, Eastern Grant, Eastern Mineral, Eastern Pendleton, Hampshire, Hardy, Jefferson, Western Grant, Western Mineral and Western Pendleton.

* Through this evening

* Additional showers and thunderstorms capable of producing heavy rainfall amounts of 2 to 4 additional inches are expected to re-develop early this morning and persist into this afternoon.

* More heavy rainfall may cause additional flash flooding.

“A Flash Flood Watch means that conditions may develop that lead to Flash Flooding,” the NWS says. “Flash Flooding is a very dangerous situation. You should monitor later forecasts and be prepared to take action should Flash Flood Warnings be issued.”

0 Comments

The Flash Flood Watch that took effect at noon today (Thursday) has now been upgraded to a Flash Flood Warning for Fairfax County.

The National Weather Service says an additional one to two inches of rain could fall in the affected areas, including Vienna, Falls Church, and Pimmit Hills, until 8:15 p.m.

Here is the full alert, which was issued at 5:05 p.m.:

* Flash Flood Warning for…
Central Fairfax County in northern Virginia…
Southeastern Loudoun County in northern Virginia…
The Western City of Alexandria in northern Virginia…
The City of Fairfax in northern Virginia…
The City of Falls Church in northern Virginia…

* Until 815 PM EDT.

* At 505 PM EDT, Doppler radar indicated thunderstorms producing heavy rain across the warned area. Between 1 and 3 inches of rain have fallen. Flash flooding is ongoing or expected to begin shortly.

HAZARD…Life threatening flash flooding. Thunderstorms producing flash flooding.

SOURCE…Doppler radar.

IMPACT…Life threatening flash flooding of creeks and streams, urban areas, highways, streets and underpasses.

The NWS advises against traveling, noting that the majority of flood deaths occur in vehicles.

“A Flash Flood Warning means that flooding is imminent or occurring,” the NWS said. “If you are in the warned area move to higher ground immediately. Residents living along streams and creeks should take immediate precautions to protect life and property.”

0 Comments

The National Weather Service has issued a Flash Flood Watch for the D.C. region, including Fairfax County, that will take effect at noon today (Thursday).

Set to expire at midnight, the advisory warns of the potential for two to four inches of rain to fall within a short period of time:

* From Noon EDT today through this evening

* A cold front will drop southward into the area today. This front will become the focus for slow moving thunderstorms this afternoon and evening. Because of the slow motion and ample moisture in the atmosphere, storms may drop 2 to 4 inches of rain a short period of time, resulting in flash flooding.

* Heavy rainfall in a short amount of time can result in rapid rises of water in streams, creeks, and urban areas.

The Baltimore-Washington NWS says the Flash Flood Watch is primarily in effect for the the northern and central parts of the region, but flooding could occur almost anywhere, and the risk could extend to tomorrow (Friday).

“A Flash Flood Watch means that conditions may develop that lead to Flash Flooding. Flash Flooding is a very dangerous situation,” the NWS said. “You should monitor later forecasts and be prepared to take action should Flash Flood Warnings be issued.”

0 Comments

Fairfax County is designing restoration plans for an eroded stretch of Little Pimmit Run from Franklin Park Road to just upstream of Kirby Road in McLean.

The $9.23 million project will address 7,100 feet of degraded stream channel in addition to about 1,250 feet of tributaries, which will be restored so that they tie into the main channel of Little Pimmit Run.

“The water has a lot of energy and it’s causing a lot of erosion,” project manager Fred Wilkins said during a recent meeting.

According to Wilkins, the project aims to slow the speed of the water, which will protect infrastructure and area vegetation. It will also restore the ecology of the stream and the surrounding area, while preventing sediment and pollutants from flowing from Little Pimmit Run into the Chesapeake Bay.

Identified in 2019, other problems caused by the ongoing erosion include undercut banks and compromised trees, the county’s project page says.

Wilkins says another goal of the project is to protect infrastructure.

“There are multiple locations where we have sanitary pipes that cross the stream bed, and in some cases, the water can move debris that can damage the sanitary crossings, as shown during the 2019 storm, which caused emergency repairs to be needed,” he said.

Last but not least, the project manager said the county aims “to give the community something to enjoy.”

The project will unfold in two phases, starting with a stretch of stream from Franklin Park Road to Chesterbrook Road that runs parallel to Solitaire Lane. The second phase picks up north of Chesterbrook Road and goes away the way to Kirby Road.

Right now, county officials are deliberating the future alignment of the channel. Once one is chosen, concept designs should be ready to be submitted this September 2021. A community meeting is slated for November.

There will not be a construction timeline until the designs are completed.

The project straddles private property and county property, and will require coordination between the county and property owners, Wilkins said.

People in the area can expect to see flagging and survey markers over the next several months, according to the county’s project website.

“Survey markers do not necessarily mean that the marked tree will be removed,” the website said.

This restoration work joins another stream restoration project along the channel between Forest Lane and North Albemarle Street, along with a sewer realignment project, emergency wastewater stabilization, and a Fairfax County Department of Transportation sidewalk project, Wilkins said.

The project is being funded through the county Stormwater Service District.

Images via Fairfax County

0 Comments

(Updated 9:10 a.m.) A Flash Flood Watch is in effect for most of the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area, including Fairfax County and Falls Church, on Christmas Eve tomorrow.

The watch will take effect Thursday afternoon and remain in place late into the night.

Here’s more from the National Weather Service, which issued the alert at 5:09 a.m. today (Wednesday):

* ONE AND HALF TO TWO AND HALF INCHES OF RAIN ARE EXPECTED THURSDAY  AFTERNOON AND THURSDAY NIGHT. THIS IS EXPECTED TO RESULT IN FLASH  FLOODING OF SMALL STREAMS AND CREEKS AND POSSIBLE RIVER FLOODING

Correction: This article initially, erroneously said the Flood Flood Watch would also be in effect on Friday.

0 Comments

Updated 9:50 a.m. — Aas a Flood Warning is in effect for the area until 3:30 p.m. today. NWS said that Vienna, Falls Church, Tysons and Merrifield may experience flooding. 

Earlier: People can expect more thunderstorms and possibly heavy rain.

The National Weather Service issued a Flash Flood Watch for today (Thursday).

More from NWS:

Slow moving thunderstorms capable of producing heavy rainfall may develop today. Heavy rainfall from thunderstorms may lead to flash flooding.

Potential impacts include rapid rises of water, flooded roads and flooding of structures in low lying areas near streams. Landslides and washouts are also possible.

People are advised to not drive through water they don’t know the depth.

0 Comments

Get ready for another summer thunderstorm. A Flash Flood Watch will be in effect in Fairfax County this afternoon and evening.

The National Weather Service says that thunderstorms and showers could bring 1-2 inches of rain with some areas possibly getting up to 4 inches.

“A cold front will move into the area Wednesday and then stall out,” according to NWS. “Numerous slow-moving showers and thunderstorms will pose a risk of flash flooding.”

0 Comments

Ahead of Tropical Storm Isaias hitting the D.C. region, Fairfax County officials and forecasters are sharing resources and tips to help people prepare for the storm.

“Significant flash flooding of small streams and creeks is likely tonight into Tuesday evening as rainfall associated with Tropical Storm Isaias spreads northward,” according to Fairfax County. Forecasters predict that the storm will bring 3-6 inches of rain.

Currently, the Tysons area is under a Tropical Storm Warning, which means that tropical storm-force winds are expected somewhere within this area within the next 36 hours,” according to National Weather Service.

The area will be under a Flash Flood Watch from 11 p.m. tonight to the same time Tuesday night and a Coastal Flood Watch will also be in effect from Tuesday morning to Wednesday.

Due to flooding risks, Fairfax County officials are reminding drivers to turn around if they see water and don’t know how deep it is. The county also tweeted out contact information for the appropriate people to call if someone spots a downed tree.

NWS wants people to protect property in flood-prone areas.

The Washington Post’s Capital Weather Gang tweeted that waves of heavy rain are expected to hit the D.C. region by Tuesday morning and that commuters should allow for extra time.

Image via NWS Baltimore-Washington/Twitter

0 Comments

Updated 11:55 a.m. — The National Weather Service placed Fairfax County under a Tropical Storm Warning shortly after 11 a.m. today. “A Tropical Storm Warning means tropical storm-force winds are expected somewhere within this area within the next 36 hours,” according to NWS.

Earlier: As Tropical Storm Isaias hits the East Coast, forecasters warn that the Tysons area could see flash flooding early this week.

The Tysons area will be under a Flash Flood Watch from 11 p.m. tonight to the same time Tuesday night. “Moderate coastal flooding is possible at times of high tide Tuesday as Tropical Storm Isaias makes its closest approach to the area,” the National Weather Service said.

NWS says that widespread rainfall between 3-6 inches is expected, with possibly more in certain areas.

A Coastal Flood Watch will also be in effect from Tuesday morning to Wednesday.

“Rainfall associated with Tropical Storm Isaias is expected to start spreading northward late Monday night and continue into Tuesday evening,” according to NWS.

Forecasters encourage people to protect flood-prone property as soon as possible and monitor the weather. People should not attempt to drive through water if they don’t know how deep it is.

 

0 Comments
×

Subscribe to our mailing list