Tysons, VA

The Weekly Planner is a roundup of interesting events coming up over the next week in the Tysons area.

We’ve scoured the web for events of note in Tysons, Vienna, Merrifield, McLean and Falls Church. Know of any we’ve missed? Tell us!

Tuesday (Sept. 12)

  • Mayor at Your Service — 7:30 p.m. at Town Hall (127 S. Center Street) — Susan Shaw from the Virginia Department of Transportation along will join Town of Vienna Mayor Laurie DiRocco to discuss the I-66 expansion project near the Vienna/Fairfax-GMU Metro station. The event is free and open to the public.

Wednesday (Sept. 11)

  • Canvas Painting — 7-9:30 p.m. at Muse Fairfax (2920 District Avenue, Suite 100) — An instructor will teach attendees how to paint a road and nature scene. The event is $35 and open to all ages.
  • Yoga with Alyson — 10 a.m. at Caboose Tavern (520 Mill Street NE) — For $10, participants can take part in a yoga class. All experience levels are welcome and guests should bring their own mats.

Friday (Sept. 13)

  • DMV 2 Go Full-Service Bus — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Falls Church City Hall parking lot (300 Park Avenue) — The Department of Motor Vehicles will host a pop-up full-service office, helping people to obtain identification cards. The service will also help people apply for various licenses including fishing and hunting, driving permits, ordering disability placards and registering to vote.

Saturday (Sept. 14)

  • Red Cross Wilderness First Aid — 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. at Campaign Pay It Forward (9893 Georgetown Pike, Suite 105 — This two-day training course prepares attendees for dangerous wilderness scenarios and how to take care of medical emergencies in the field. It costs $150 and everyone is welcome.
  • Vienna Quarterly Recycling Day — 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Northside Property Yard (600 Mill Street NE) — People can come and recycle unusual items such as chemicals, appliances or small electronics. No TVs or dangerous items will be accepted.
  • Comedy and Cocktails — 8 t0 10 p.m. at Falls Church Distillers (442 S. Washington Street A) — North American Comedy Distillery Tour will bring nationally known comedians to Falls Church for an evening of humor. Presale tickets start at $20.
  • 2019 Wolf Trap Ball: Singapore — 7 p.m. at Filene Center (1551 Trap Road) — This black-tie gala supports Wolf Trap’s arts and cultural foundation while allowing guests to enjoy a classy evening with Singapore Ambassadors Ashok Mirpuri and Gouri Mirpuri. Email Wolf Trap for tickets.

Sunday (Sept. 15)

  • Tysons Farmers Market — every Sunday through November from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. at 1961 Chain Bridge Road — The weekly farmers market features local produce, meats, eggs, hot foods, baked goods and more. In addition to food, attendees can enjoy live music, cooking demonstrations and kids events. The market accepts SNAP and matching on all SNAP purchases.

Image via Wolf Trap

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The Weekly Planner is a roundup of interesting events coming up over the next week in the Tysons area.

We’ve scoured the web for events of note in Tysons, Vienna, Merrifield, McLean and Falls Church. Know of any we’ve missed? Tell us!

Tuesday (Aug. 13)

  • Stray Cats 40th Anniversary Tour — 8-11 p.m. at Wolf Trap (1551 Trap Road) — The band will celebrate its 40-year anniversary with a performance. Tickets start at $35.

Wednesday (Aug. 14)

  • Wednesday West Coast Swing Lessons and Dance — 8 p.m. at Latin Dancer Studio (1057 W. Broad Street, Suite 221) — This event invites newbies and seasoned dancers alike to join lessons and an open dance floor later in the evening. Tickets are $15 for a lesson or just $10 after 10 p.m. for the social dance.

Thursday (Aug. 15)

  • Karaoke Thursday! — 8-11 p.m. at Falls Church Distillers (442 S. Washington Street) — This locally owned distillery opens their doors for patrons to come to sing and enjoy some spirits.

Friday (Aug. 16)

  • The Slambovian Circus of Dreams and Lumen Jingos — 8 p.m. at the Jammin Java (227 E. Maple Avenue) — The bands take to the stage for an evening of live music. Both bands have been described as “psychedelic.” Tickets are $25.
  • McLean Famers Market — 8 a.m. at Lewinsville Park (1659 Chain Bride Road) — This event will feature fresh veggies and food from local vendors.

Saturday (Aug. 17)

  • Family Bingo Party With Food for Others — noon-3 p.m. at Brandbox Lounge at Tysons Corner Center — Food for Others will host an event to raise awareness for their cause while attendees play games and win prizes.

Photo via The Slambovian Circus of Dreams/Facebook

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People outside Tysons Corner Center might have noticed a farmers market last Sunday (June 9).

Community Foodworks announced on Friday (June 7) that the Tysons Farmers Market relocated from 8400 Westpark Drive to The Plaza.

Community Foodworks, a nonprofit that works to connect food from farmers to underserved populations, operates 15 farmers markets in Northern Virginia and D.C.

Vendors at the Tysons Farmers Market include:

The Tysons Farmers Market runs from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. on Sundays through November.

Image via @tysonsfoodworks/Instagram

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The McLean Farmers Market came back to Lewinsville Park today (May 3), selling local fruits, vegetables, baked goods and drinks for the spring, summer and fall.

The farmers market, which features 20 vendors, will take place at 1659 Chain Bridge Road every Friday from 8 a.m.-noon. until November 15. The farmers market will be closed on May 17 due to set-up for McLean Day.

Some of the vendors include Dawn & Dusk Craft Coffee Bar, Grace’s Pastries, Lyn Phipps Plants and Westmoreland Berry Farm. The Master Gardener Plant Clinic at the farmers market will help answer questions about plants.

Shoppers will need to leave their pets at home.

The McLean one is one of several farmers markets in the area. Vienna’s starts tomorrow. FRESHFARM in the Mosaic District started in April.

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(Updated 4 p.m.) Fairfax County wants to make it easier for locals to garden and for farmers markets to operate.

As the county gets denser, residents are finding new ways to get in touch with their green thumb. A series of zoning changes planned for discussion at tomorrow’s (Wednesday) Planning Commission meeting would loosen restrictions around gardening and farmers markets.

The proposals would create a new “community garden” use in the zoning code. These gardens could be located on either the ground floor or rooftop and could be considered common open space by right, meaning no additional zoning requirements would be required for approval.

According to the staff report on the amendment:

By expanding the definition of open space to include community gardens, homeowners or condominium associations will be able to establish community gardens subject to the proposed use standards… Similarly, the proposed amendment permits non-residential developments, such as places of worship, office, and other commercial and industrial developments, schools, et cetera to establish community gardens by right as accessory uses in open space, subject to the proposed use standards.

Analysis of community gardens by Fairfax County showed that most occupy less than two acres of land, but gardens proposed above two acres could still be approved with a special permit from the Board of Zoning Appeals.

The changes also remove a restriction that only allows gardens on side or rear yards of single-family residential lots. Gardens could be allowed in front yards, provided they are no closer than 15 feet to the front of the lot and limited to 10 feet squared in area.

The zoning changes would also loosen up restrictions on farmers markets. Currently, farmers markets are a temporary special permit with what the report calls “significant restrictions.” They are currently only permitted to sell seasonal or perishable produce between April and November and only on lots that front arterial streets.

But the report recognizes that farmers markets have evolved substantially since those regulations were written and have expanded the to food beyond just produce.

The new regulations would permit farmers markets for two-year periods and allow year-round operation. The markets would also be allowed to operate away from major roads, a rule that the staff report said half of the existing markets ignore anyway.

The only restriction on merchandise at farmers markets would be that items for sale must be farm products or products derived from a farm, like salsa using ingredients from a farm.

The changes are planned to go to the Board of Supervisors on June 25, and if approved, could take effect by 12:01 a.m. the day after adoption.

“Staff believes that this amendment provides a balanced approach to providing easier access to fresh, healthy food to residents in all areas of the County,” staff said in the report, “while ensuring that the uses of community gardens, farmers markets, and residential gardening are established to be good neighbors.”

Photo via @claire_brunette/Instagram

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As the Mosaic District moves forward with plans to relaunch its weekly farmers market, the old market’s leadership is starting a competing market four miles away.

The Mosaic District announced in early March that the nonprofit FRESHFARM would be taking over the Mosaic Farmers Market.

Central Farm Markets, the organization that for the last six years had managed the farmers market at the Mosaic District, said on their website that the announcement was a shock to them.

“We were told, with just a few weeks notice and for no reason, that we had to leave the property,” the organization said on their website. “As you can imagine this has been a very difficult time for us and our vendors. In a matter of weeks we had to find a new location, enroll vendors and take care of all of the business matters associated with such an enormous move.”

Tysons Reporter reached out to the Mosaic District inquiring about the change but received no response.

The Mosaic Central Farm Market was able to find a space at George C. Marshall High School (7731 Leesburg Pike) and rebranded as NOVA Central Farm Market.

Debra Moser, co-owner of Central Farm Market, said many of the vendors from the earlier Mosaic venue will carry over to the new location, and the arrangement with local non-profits to pick up left over food and deliver it to those in need will continue.

Both markets are planning a grand opening this Sunday (April 7).

Moser said Central Farm Market was never given a reason for why they were replaced.

“Moving a market, getting it reestablished in a short period of time was a great undertaking,” Moser said. “But we’re looking forward to the opening on Sunday.”

Photo via Facebook

 

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D.C.-based nonprofit FRESHFARM will be taking over the Mosaic Farmers Market and is planning a market season kick off for April 6 and 7.

According to a press release from FRESHFARM, the market will operate every Sunday from 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. and will feature over 50 regional farmers and vendors selling fresh produce, bread, meat and other farmers market staples. The market is scheduled to run through December.

Current market vendors offer selections from crepes to candles and one vendor, Chase Your Tail Bakery, that makes handcrafted dog biscuits.

“The Mosaic Farmers Market is a vibrant part of this thriving community, and we were honored that EDENS invited us to join them in bringing delicious, locally grown and produced food to Mosaic District,” Julia Feder, executive director of FRESHFARM, said in the press release. “We look forward to getting to know the residents, visitors, and local businesses in the Mosaic neighborhood this season.”

FRESHFARM operates 16 farmers markets throughout the region, with an emphasis on locally sourced food.

That same weekend, the Mosaic District is also scheduled to host the “Art Blooms at Mosaic” festival, a cherry blossom event in partnership with the National Cherry Blossom Festival.

Photo via @claire_brunette/Instagram

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Get the fresh fruit and veggies while you can, because several local farmers markets will be closing for the season next month.

In and around Tysons, there are at least four weekly farmers markets to choose from:

The Tysons Farmers Market is held Sundays from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. at the National Automobile Dealers Association parking lot (8400 Westpark Dr). Organized by Community Foodworks, the market features a variety of vendors offering everything from empanadas to coffee to fresh produce.

Like the Tysons market, the McLean Farmers Market starts up for the season in May and closes in mid-November. There are four market days left for the popular McLean bazaar of locally-produced food, which is held every Friday from 8 a.m.-noon in Lewinsville Park (1659 Chain Bridge Rd).

In addition to a variety of vendors, the Master Gardener Plant Clinic sets up at the McLean market to help locals learn more about the vegetation of their yards.

The Vienna Farmers Market, meanwhile, will not be open this weekend, according to its website. There’s only one market day remaining before the Vienna market closes for the season: Saturday, Nov. 3, from 8 a.m.-noon.

For those in the area who need to get their farmers market fix year round, the Mosaic District hosts a weekly farmers market on Sundays that runs through the winter. Mosaic Central Farmers Market is held at 2910 District Ave from 9:30 a.m.-2 p.m. — that is, until the end of December.

From January to March, the market shifts to a winter market, with modified hours and 40 vendors instead of the usual 55, according to its website.

Photo via Facebook

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