Tysons, VA

(Updated 3:55 p.m.) Madison Reed will start selling hair color products and open its Color Bar this weekend in the Mosaic District.

Madison Reed will open at 2921 District Avenue, Suite 130 on Saturday, July 11. Customers will be able to book color service and free color consultations, buy products and participate in the Unlimited Roots Membership.

Because of the pandemic, clients will be spaced every other chair and appointments will be staggered to allow for cleanings, Mary O’Connell, a company spokesperson, told Tysons Reporter. People will have to book appointments in advance — and will get “texted in” to their appointments when they show up — but can walk in for retail purchases, she said.

Additionally, the new stores will have new HVAC systems to help with air quality control, and clients can expect masks, gloves, social distancing and temperature checks.

Instead of a grand opening party, the store will give away a free color service and blowout to the first 100 people who email them.

“We couldn’t have a party as much as we would love to have a party,” O’Connell said.

The pandemic did not significantly delay the Mosaic location’s opening, which was set for early June, she said. In addition to the Mosaic District location, Madison Reed is also opening locations in Reston Town Center and Rockville on Saturday.

Clients can expect reduced hours from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday at the Mosaic District.

While many businesses have struggled during the pandemic, O’Connell said that Madison Reed saw sales increase 1,300% — “just a huge number” — due to customers purchasing kits to color their hair at home. At one point, boxes of color kits were selling every five seconds, she said.

Because of the boom, Madison Reed did not furlough any employees and instead had them help with the orders, she said.

“Hair color matters to women,” O’Connell said, adding that the company attributes the sales to brand loyalty and “looking at yourself on Zoom.”

Photo via Mosaic District/Facebook

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BGR Burger Grilled Right is no longer open in the Mosaic District.

“Unfortunately we are permanently closed as we were unable to reach a reasonable settlement with our landlord like we did in our other locations,” Fred Glick, the president of Amergent Hospitality Group, Inc., told Tysons Reporter.

Glick said that the other nearby BGR locations are open. Now, diners can find BGR in Arlington, Reston and Springfield in Virginia.

Photo via BGR Mosaic/Facebook

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GreatGatherings has now closed all of its stores, including the Mosaic District location.

In early 2020, the store moved to 2905 District Ave, the former home of Neiman Marcus, from a different location in the Mosaic District.

The home goods store’s website says that the business, American Heritage Billiards, closed on June 25 after the coronavirus pandemic prompted the retail stores to close.

KeyBank confirmed the site’s messages to Tysons Reporter, sharing a complaint against the business that claims American Heritage Billiards “ceased its business operations and abandoned its personal property… on or about June 25.”

The bank is trying to seek relief through the court filing.

“The closure by American Heritage Billiards and GreatGatherings is truly an unfortunate situation for everyone involved,” Laura Mimura, a spokesperson for the bank, told Tysons Reporter.

Mimura added that the bank is not able to address issues with American Heritage Billiards’ pending orders, deliveries and outstanding invoices.

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Starting next week, people can head to the Mosaic District for drive-in movies.

The summer movie series will kick off on Friday, June 26, with “Captain Marvel,” according to a press release. People can expect a different movie on the fourth Friday of every month from June to August.

The drive-in series plans to screen “Toy Story 4” and “Jurassic Park” on July 24. The double features for Aug. 28 have not been announced yet.

People will be able to watch the movies from the seventh floor of the Market parking lot across from Moms Organic, according to the press release, which added that all of the films will have closed captioning.

Safety measures that movie-goers must follow include:

  • remaining in their cars at all times
  • designating one person per car to pick up food orders
  • only one person at a time can use the restrooms by using a text alert system

Each car will have a $28 parking fee and people will listen to the movie audio via an FM transmitter on the radio. The Mosaic District urges people to buy tickets in advance because space is limited to 75 cars.

As for food and beverages, Mosaic District is partnering with Alta Strada to offer a movie theater-inspired menu with hot dogs, popcorn and sodas, the press release said.

“All guests who order directly from the Alta Strada website will receive a complimentary bombolini or tiramisu upon selecting the ‘Free Gift’ option at checkout,” the press release said. “Other restaurants will participate in the later showings.”

The Mosaic District drive-in series follows the announcement from The Boro that the new Tysons development will also offer drive-in movies. The Boro’s series will feature movies for four weeks, starting this Friday, June 19.

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After announcing a temporary closure on March 18, the Cheesetique Mosaic location has closed permanently.

An employee at another location in Del Rey said that the location will not reopen but added she wasn’t at liberty to give a reason.

The eatery used to serve lunch, dinner and brunch, the website said, adding that it also sold cheese for take-home consumption.

Tysons Reporter reached out to the location’s owner to find out why the location closed and is awaiting a response.

Only a few days before its then-temporary closure in March, the eatery posted on its social media page, asking people to purchase gift cards. It is unclear if these will be accepted at the other two Northern Virginia locations.

Photo via Cheesetique Mosaic/Facebook

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Laura Schwartz is a licensed Realtor in VA, D.C. and MD with McEnearney Associates in McLean. Reach the office at 703-790-9090.

No babysitter? No problem! When Clarity opened their “a lot of clarity” concept with individually, socially distanced tables outside, my husband and I jumped on the idea (in fact, we have a reservation tonight) since we haven’t had a “date night” in over 3 months.

We plan to bring our reliable, charged babysitter — the iPad — and have our kids sit in the back of our SUV and properly ignore them for the duration of our dinner (let’s be honest, with the iPad, they’ll be happy to ignore us too). But this got me thinking to what else we could do to get a break from pandemic life.

Mosaic District — they have their green space blocked off from traffic with tables outside. Perfect for getting take out from Alta Strada, Jinya, Bar Taco, Matchbox or one of your other favorites and sitting outside for a meal.

Picnic — there are a lot of open green spaces around Vienna, Oakton and McLean where you can pack a lunch, get take out, and bring a blanket to sit outside for a quiet picnic. Break up the norm of your kitchen table, try getting take out from one of the spots who doesn’t have outdoor seating and may as a result not get as much traffic. Think Mo:Mo House, Social Burger, or McLean Family Restaurant.

Outside patio at Bazin’s or Blend 111 — call for reservations!

Neighborhood dinner date — one night a bunch of the mom’s in my neighborhood each brought our own chair and beverage and we set up shop on a neighbor’s driveway for a socially distanced “Mom’s Night Out.” It was a fun change of pace, and much needed break from the every day. One idea could be to have all of your neighbors bring their own drinks/dinner and have everyone sit outside on their lawns and have a neighborhood dinner. Social interaction, socially distanced.

Make sure you call your favorite restaurant and see if they’ve set up outdoor seating. I know a lot of places that didn’t have it before have found ways to create space now.

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Now that Fairfax County has started to ease some COVID-19 restrictions, new activity at the Mosaic District suggests that the shopping center may return to its pre-pandemic popularity.

Tysons Reporter’s staff photographer Jay Westcott ventured out to the Mosaic District last week right before the first part of Gov. Ralph Northam’s multi-phase reopening strategy started in the county.

Westcott spotted at least a dozen people milling around the green outside the Angelika Film Center, walking dogs, getting takeout from local eateries and sitting outside 6 feet apart from other people.

Deka Lash and Mom and Pop have now reopened, while Anthropologie is offering curbside pick-up, according to the Mosaic District Facebook page. Meanwhile, home goods store Great Gatherings re-reopened in its new location, the posts said.

In addition to the businesses opening their doors again after temporary closures, people can also spot signs for upcoming businesses, like Sephora, Gyu Shige and Urban Hot Pot.

Tables and chairs — with a sign warning people against moving them — are set up outside West Elm. Some of the stores and restaurants have placards on the ground to remind people to social distance.

“Practice social distancing. Wash your hands often. Wear a mask when appropriate,” the sign said.

For that last point, many of the people Westcott captured in his photos did have face coverings.

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The MacMillan Whisky Room is trying to fill a void in the local dining scene: late-night food and drinks.

The Mosaic District restaurant and bar has always focused on offering options for diners hungry past 10 p.m., but staying open late now as the coronavirus pandemic continues gives the MacMillan Whisky Room an extra advantage.

“We’re open at least one to two hours later than everyone else [in the area],” Derek Anderson, who co-owns the bar along with his wife Emma Hand, told Tysons Reporter.

Currently, the restaurant is open 5-11 p.m. on Sundays and Thursdays and until midnight on Fridays and Saturdays, but Anderson said those hours might get extended once the patio seating opens this Friday (May 29).

The MacMillan Whisky Room reopened on Saturday for its one-year anniversary and to attract Memorial Day diners after being closed since March, Anderson said.

“It was kind of important to us for our one year anniversary,” Anderson said. “It was a symbolic way to come back.”

Currently, carry-out and a limited delivery service are available. The menu features small plates like tater tots and beef sliders, cocktails including gimlets and margaritas, wine, beer and “hearty fare,” which consists of steak and Guinness pie for $14.

People who order drinks will get their cocktails already mixed in 6 oz. custom bottles, which may come with garnishes on the side. “People seem to like that more than the red solo cup,” Anderson said. “We’re trying to keep it classy.”

The owners decided to not use third-party delivery services due to increased liability with alcohol deliveries, the percentages they take, along with “other issues.” Instead, they are opting to deliver to people living in the Merrifield area. “It’s going to be where we can walk,” he said.

The reopening is helping them prepare for when Northern Virginia starts to ease business restrictions.

“We’ve already set up our outdoor seating area,” he said, noting that the tables are spaced 6 feet apart.

Anderson is hoping that diners “don’t want to storm the patio.”

“If they come back too quickly, it will come back to an increase in cases,” he said, adding that he wants customers to know that restaurant staff — at his place and others — “are facing health threats from these big crowds.”

Now that he’s received a Paycheck Protection Program loan during the second round in early May, he expects that they will slowly rehire more staff. So far, they have brought back six of the 25 people who worked there in pre-COVID times.

“That was the hardest part of all of this,” he said about letting all of the employees go when the restaurant closed. Currently, they are prioritizing rehiring people who haven’t found new jobs, left the area or aren’t receiving unemployment benefits.

“With the nature of our carry-out business now, we’re not having as many bartenders,” he said.

Since the PPP loan is primarily meant to pay employees, Anderson said that the Small Business Administration loan they got “is what is really allowing us to ride out the delays.”

They’re also eyeing Fairfax County’s new loan programs to help small businesses impacted by COVID-19.

As long as everyone stays safe, Anderson is hopeful that the business will bounce back.

“We think we’re going to ride this out pretty well,” he said.

Photo via MacMillan Whisky Room/Facebook

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A family-owned dry cleaning business has turned its Mosaic District location into a “little mask factory,” one of its owners says.

Dianne Lee interview and her husband Je Kang run The Press at 2985 District Ave, along with the three locations in D.C.

Lee told Tysons Reporter that they started preparing for the coronavirus in February. Now, they are busy making handmade masks.

People who stop by the Mosaic District location can see the employees sewing through the window.

They have donated them to Children’s National Hospital, police stations, leasing companies and more. So far, they’ve been prioritizing giving masks to the hospitals first. People can email them requests — even if the request is as small as one, two or three.

“We went from making 50-100 masks a day to 500-800 masks a day now,” Lee said.

The Press posted on Instagram on April 20 that it has donated more than 3,000 masks.

Lee said her husband, who studied rare and infectious diseases, “was just really adamant about making sure that everyone in the community has a mask.”

“We’ve gotten phone calls from moms,” Lee said, adding that they decline offers to buy masks. Instead, they give them out for free and rely on a fundraiser to pay for supplies.

Lee said the pivot to masks has kept their employees busy since the demand for laundering and dry cleaning services has dropped. “We saw a 90% decrease in sales at one point,” she said.

Clients can still have their clothes cleaned. Lee said she’s encouraging people to use their home delivery service. People can do curbside pick-up and drop-off at the Mosaic District location.

“There is more wash and fold these days,” Lee said. “We’ve seen more designer sweatpants.”

Following guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Lee said that they don’t touch the items that need to be cleaned for a while, which makes the process take a few extra days.

“We ask customers if they have been exposed [to the virus] and have waiver forms,” she said.

Lee hopes that when the stay-at-home orders get lifted in the D.C. area that the dry cleaning business will bounce back.

“People will hopefully be going out and wearing more clothes,” she said.

But until then, they’ll keep making masks.

“We transformed our location into a little mask factory,” Lee said.

Photo via The Press Dry Cleaning & Laundry/Facebook

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Tips for applying eyeliner. #Gratitudeattitude appreciation posts for staff and clients. Inspiration messages reminding people to relax. These are some of the many social media posts by a local lash studio.

Deka Lash opened last spring in the Mosaic District. Christina Cox, a local teacher, and her husband, who is a retired U.S. Army officer, are the owners behind the franchise.

Cox told Tysons Reporter said that she’s been using social media as a way to keep people’s spirits up and remind them of the studio’s plans to keep clients and staff safe during the pandemic.

“Now we are letting our clients know everything we’re doing and that we take this seriously,” she said.

The small studio only had five beds to begin with, and lash artists were already wearing masks, washing hands and using hand sanitizer between clients and sterilizing the equipment with an anti-fungal, anti-bacterial and anti-viral product before the pandemic.

Facebook and Instagram posts help her share how the studio is preparing to reopen. While the studio has been closed, Cox said that each last artist has received training on how to use barbicide, which is usually used in barbershops,

When the studio reopens, clients will be given pink bandanas to cover their faces and will be able to read brochures about the cleaning products being used. Both employees and clients will have their temperatures taken with non-contact thermometers.

“We want to keep our staff healthy,” Cox said. “We don’t want to put anybody at risk.”

Blankets for clients will be washed after every single use. Tools will be sterilized and disinfected after every client and frequently touched services like the front desk will be cleaned frequently, she said.

The cancellation policy will be changed so that people won’t be charged for no-shows or late cancellations.

To limit contact, clients will be able to check-in and book new appointments using the smartphone app, she said. Previously, the studio allowed walk-ins and let people bring friends or their kids, but not anymore due to safety precautions.

When the studio reopens, only three of the five beds will be used, and Cox hopes to only have two lash artists working at the same time.

“The only thing we are not doing — we haven’t figured out a way to apply extensions from six feet away,” Cox said. “But everything else, we’ve got it covered.”

Sharing these steps on social media is a way to build and keep trust among clients, Cox said.

“We are ready and we were already doing so many things beforehand and it will be more visible,” Cox said.

Cox said that she’s using social media during the pandemic to stay connected to clients and reach out to new people.

“I think more people are on social media now more than ever,” she said, adding that her strategy is to send a “message of hope.”

The pandemic has hit the business hard. When Tysons Reporter talked to Cox last week, she was still waiting to hear about her federal loan application.

“We’re in our first year of operation, so this is a kick in the teeth,” she said about the financial blow to the business.

But Cox remains optimistic about getting back on track financially in the near future: “I am hoping that we can pick up right where we left off in about three to six months.”

“For the most part, if you had disposable income for lashes — our clients are in a solid financial position,” Cox said, adding that the pandemic might be a temporary financial setback to clients but not devastating to their disposable income.

Even with non-essential businesses temporarily closed and the stay-at-home order, Cox said there’s still a demand for lashes.

“I have people calling me, ‘Do you make house calls?’ ‘No, we’re closed!'” Cox said.

While businesses in Northern Virginia won’t see restrictions loosened until May 29 at the earliest, Cox said that she will be ready to open the studio back up right away — and so will her clients.

Cox said that people who want to support the studio while it’s closed can buy gift cards online, book ahead for appointments and — for clients — write Yelp or Google reviews.

“This virus is not likely going away but we have to continue to live,” she said. “We don’t want the cure to be worse than the disease.”

Images via Deka Lash Facebook and Instagram

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