Tysons, VA

Recently labeled by Forbes as a “hidden gem” getaway spot for travelers, Tysons has plenty of options for a vacation or staycation — especially for foodies.

Tysons is undergoing major rebranding by the Tysons Partnership and developers, who want to rethink the area as a major metropolitan destination. Along with new events hosted by Tysons Partnership also comes a push from Fairfax County itself to drive traffic to Tysons.

Visit Fairfax wants to increase tourism in Tysons by expanding conference centers around the area and educating people on the dining opportunities, according to the organization’s CEO Barry Biggar.

For people visiting Tysons — or who already live here and want to enjoy a staycation — the restaurant scene seems to be a big attractor.

Last week, Tysons Reporter asked readers what they’d prefer to spend extra money on in the area when it comes to leisurely activities. Of the responses, fine dining beat shopping for the most votes.

Biggar told Tysons Reporter in a recent interview that there are many upcoming restaurants that people might not know about in the area unless they work nearby.

If he took a vacation in the area, he said he would “sample at least two or three culinary opportunities” over the course of a weekend.

For example, Agora (7911 Westpark Drive) opened in July and serves up specialties from Turkey, Greece and Lebanon in a split-level eatery featuring Turkish decor. Entre prices range from roughly $10 to $15, according to the menu on the eatery’s website.

Agora is participating in the extended Metropolitan Washington Restaurant Week, leeting foodies can take advantage of set lunch and dinner specials through Sunday (Jan. 26). For $35, guests can order a four-course dinner, which includes a sampler of htipiti, cacik, hummus, a choice of starter, a main meal and dessert.

Though not a new restaurant, Eddie V’s Prime Seafood and Steaks (7900 Tysons One Place) is participating in the restaurant week specials and offers fresh seafood with a high-class dining experience.

Diners can start with a caviar tasting for $169, which offers a trio of flavors. For the main course, people have the choice of various fishes, meats and a few vegetarian options. Salads, sides and drinks are also available.

For people on a budget who want to skip the $75+ seafood platters, there are other appetizers available, like the Hawaiian Yellowtail Sashimi for $19. The price of the main courses range from $36 to $90.

Gary Block, the chief investment officer of The Meridian Group, said at a Bisnow event in Tysons last week that Eddie V’s “is packed” on Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights.

Anyone craving breakfast can check out Founding Farmers (1800 Tysons Blvd), which has multiple locations around the D.C. area — each offering various deals and specials, according to the website.

The $33 breakfast buffet cost includes unlimited fried shrimp and green tomatoes, brisket, bacon, eggs in every style, pancakes, breakfast breads, fried chicken, grits, gravy, potatoes, salads and desserts. If the unlimited buffet isn’t ideal, the restaurant also offers single plates, sides and à la carte options.

The eatery also serves up mimosas, bloody mary drinks and other cocktails for $10.

The food options continue to diversify in Tysons — both in price ranges and cuisine.

From the upcoming openings of a new concept from the owners of the now-closed Tysons Biergarten and restaurants like North Italia in The Boro to the arrival of City Works, three spots from Great American Restaurants and more in 2019, diners have a variety of choices.

Let us know in the comments below where you like to dine around Tysons.

Photo via Founding Farmers Tysons/Facebook

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